Aisha


Aisha’, an adaptation of Jane Austen's classic Emma is chic, cool, stylish, fast, appealing to the eyes but lacks emotions. The film shows the modern, fast urban life of Delhi. The film encircles around the main protagonist ‘’ played by . ‘’ lives life of her own. She loves to deal with the problems of others. She is surrounded by hordes of friends. Everyone’s headache is her headache. plays a matchmaker.

The movie is very high on style but low on feeling. There are many characters in the film but as the film proceeds, one would get to know how they are related to each other. () always eyes opposite gender because she wants a perfect match for her friend Shefali (Amrita Puri). There is Arjun (), who is an investment banker and he is an irritation for her. He thinks ’s matchmaking business is rubbish. He laughs at her and she hates her. Another close client of is Randhir Gambhir (Cyrus Sahukar) who too wants a life partner and helping him for the right match is one and only . He is the son of a mithai baron.

There is also handsome Dhruv (Arunoday Singh), a London returned charming dude for whom develops a liking. ’s object of jealousy is Aarti (Lisa Haydon), who is gorgeous and sexy and a very close friend of Dhruv. Confusion creates when gets to know that Randhir loves him and he does not have any feeling for Shefali. Frustrated moved on to find a new match for Shefali. Meanwhile, Arjun tries to convince that what she is doing is not right. By the time, she realizes the wrong, blunder happens.

The film is very high on fashion. The designers have done a great job to make the characters look attractive. The music too rocks. Dialogues are good throughout. The problem is with the script. What the film tries to convey is difficult to understand. It is neither a romantic nor a tragedy film.

Speaking about performances, played her part well. She rocks throughout. She acted fluently. Every parts of her body moved and acted. had a little part to enact. Hope, he gets some more scenes in his bag. Ira Dubey, Arunoday Singh and Lisa Haydon are competent. Amrita Puri steals the show.

Rajshree Ojha gave more importance to the look of the film rather than the content.

In the nutshell, is a treat for the eyes. It is film to be enjoyed with cola on one hand and popcorn on the other. It doesn't touch one's heart.